Budget 2016: Rural and property points

Headline points from the 2016 Budget for the rural economy and property. Get out of sugar, get into tunnelling, run a micro-business on the side, infrastructure needs you, take your capital gains now, incorporation is looking better and better unless you intend to sell your professional services to the public sector, drink whisky and beer not wine. Despite this, old age and death are beginning to look expensive.

A £3.5 bn reduction in public expenditure is not intended to dent George Osborne’s claim that, “We [ie the Conservative Government] are the builders”. Practically this means Continue reading “Budget 2016: Rural and property points”

Inheritance Tax Residence Exemption: Even more smoke and mirrors from the 2015 Summer Budget

The fanfare for this Summer’s July Budget trumpeted the arrival of a £1 million IHT exemption for the family home.  The detail is not so clear cut.  Chancellor George Osborne has introduced a new residence exemption from IHT.  It works like this. Continue reading “Inheritance Tax Residence Exemption: Even more smoke and mirrors from the 2015 Summer Budget”

Trustees: Need to Know 3 – Tax is not the only reason

Trusts are subject to Income Tax, Value Added Tax, Capital Gains Tax and Inheritance Tax in much the same way as individuals.  Each tax has important differences in the way it treats trusts, generally treating the trust as a higher rate taxpayer with little or no personal allowance.  Inheritance Tax in particular has a special regime for the taxation of some types of trust, where tax is levied every 10 years on a revaluation of trust assets.  Tax should never be the driving force behind the creation of a trust, but it is important that trustees have a broad understanding of the tax position.

This will be one of the topics reviewed in more depth during the forthcoming Trustee Training Events at Rhug estate and Ragley Hall, organised in conjunction with the CLA. For more details:

Trust Programme Spring 2015

This is the third of 10 brief ‘Need to Know’ notes for trustees and their professional advisers.

Trustee Development Spring 2015

The personal responsibility of an estate trustee far exceeds that of a company director, shareholder, limited liability partner or sole trader. This responsibility extends to settlors and beneficiaries, and many others besides. Many people rely on rural estates for their livelihood and homes. Estates are under wider public scrutiny on a scale never experienced before. The complexities of farming and rural estate management have never been greater. New business opportunities abound for the creative estate manager, but the prospect of commercial reward comes with risk.

Working with the CLA we have devised a one day trustee training course which includes a tour of an award-winning estate. The Rhug estate will be our host on 17 March 2015, and we are delighted to be visiting Ragley Hall for the first time on 21 March.

The programme will ensure that estate trustees know their job: a vital safeguard for settlors, beneficiaries, estate managers, other professional advisers and, not least, trustees themselves.

Training Outcomes
On successful completion you should:
• Understand the extent of the personal responsibility of a trustee to beneficiaries;
• Understand the trustees’ role, authority and responsibility in the management of a rural estate;
• Participate effectively in trustees’ meetings and other trust business;
• Relate effectively to beneficiaries, settlors, staff, key advisers and other interested parties in the strategic management and direction of a rural estate

To book a place please follow this link:

https://www.dropbox.com/s/gsuas1gvrojpiib/Trust%20Programme%20Spring%202015.pdf?dl=0

Alternatively, please email Charles Cowap, cdcowap@gmail.com or call Charles on 07947 706505, or use the contact form below. RICS members, chartered accountants and solicitors will be able to claim formal CPD in respect of their participation.

Valuation: Cross-roads or cul-de-sac?

This was the title of my presentation at the RICS Wales Rural Conference held on Tuesday 9 December 2014 in Llandrindod Wells.  Here are the slides.

The contrast between the complexities of valuing woodland for taxation purposes and renewable energy installations is meant to indicate the broad sweep of the challenge facing the modern rural valuer. This is a challenge which is likely to be become broader and more complex with the need to consider the valuation of natural services and capital. Equally the accountability of valuers is only set to grow as the two case updates demonstrate.

One wood worth £70,000 but potentially five different Inheritance Tax bills ranging from nil to £28,000. Capital Gains Tax with potential bills on disposal ranging from less than £5,000 to more than £11,000.  This Wednesday’s web class will explain how to keep the tax bill down.  It will also look at the wider benefits that might be available to an estate that keeps its woods in good order.  RICS Web classes are not restricted to RICS members.  They provide a very cost-effective way to make sure you are up to date from the convenience of your own computer, and because they are ‘live’ you have all the benefits of being able to ask questions, and take part in online discussions.  This class in particular is highly relevant to anybody with an interest in private woodland ownership and management.

Details here: http://www.rics.org/uk/training-events/e-learning/web-classes/woodland-taxation-valuation/online/