Two really useful CPD events at Harper Adams

Two forthcoming events at Harper Adams University, Shropshire should be of great interest to practising rural surveyors, valuers and other rural land managers.  The first event sees us joined by Barry Denyer Green of Falcon Chambers for a question-time event on compulsory purchase.  The second is a new rural research conference being hosted at Harper Adams for the first time.

COMPULSORY PURCHASE QUESTION TIME WITH AN EXPERT PANEL: 9 MARCH 2018

  • Barry Denyer Green of Falcon Chambers
  • Roger Bedson of Hinson Parry
  • Philip Meade of Davis Meade Property Consultants
  • Charles Cowap, Harper Adams University (chairman)

When? Friday 9 March, buffet lunch 12.45 for 13.15, followed by Question Time event at 14.00 to 15.15 and followed by tea and biscuits
Who? Renowned authority, barrister Barry Denyer-Green PhD HonRICS, HS2 Petitioner and Regional Compulsory Purchase Association organiser Roger Bedson FRICS FAAV, Partner in Hinson Parry and Philip Meade FRICS ACIarb RICS Dispute Resolution Standards chair and highly experienced arbitrator
What? A question-time style session with our distinguished panel looking at the current state of compulsory purchase. After a few opening remarks from each panel member we will throw the discussion open to the floor. We invite you to send your questions in beforehand, but we will also be able to take some questions on the day as well, by email to cdcowap@harper-adams.ac.uk
Where? Harper Adams University, near Edgmond, Newport, Shropshire TF10 8NB. Look out for the parking signs on the day.
Why? A unique opportunity to discuss the current state of our compulsory purchase code with leading authorities on the subject, and to network with fellow professionals with shared interests in this work.
How? Book and pay on the Harper Adams website at this link (or download a booking form from the same link) Cost £45+VAT (£54 including VAT) including lunch, parking and all refreshments.

RURAL RESEARCH CONFERENCE 18 APRIL 2018

This year’s programme covers a  wide range of topics including Farm tenancies, valuation, compulsory purchase, energy, health and safety, agricultural property relief, natural capital, professional negligence and others, all adding up to 6.5 hours CPD.  Latest information on the programme and booking details available on the Harper Adams website at this link.

And not forgetting the next in the Online Seminar Series with Syncskills if you prefer to update your CPD from the comfort of your office or home.  Next topic covers the role of trusts and trustees in the management of rural estates.  Between these three events you could easily cover all your CPD requirements for the year, efficiently and cost-effectively.

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Headline points from the 2016 Budget for the rural economy and property. Get out of sugar, get into tunnelling, run a micro-business on the side, infrastructure needs you, take your capital gains now, incorporation is looking better and better unless you intend to sell your professional services to the public sector, drink whisky and beer not wine. Despite this, old age and death are beginning to look expensive.

A £3.5 bn reduction in public expenditure is not intended to dent George Osborne’s claim that, “We [ie the Conservative Government] are the builders”. Practically this means Continue reading “Budget 2016: Rural and property points”

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The fanfare for this Summer’s July Budget trumpeted the arrival of a £1 million IHT exemption for the family home.  The detail is not so clear cut.  Chancellor George Osborne has introduced a new residence exemption from IHT.  It works like this. Continue reading “Inheritance Tax Residence Exemption: Even more smoke and mirrors from the 2015 Summer Budget”

Business tools for the rural estate: long and medium term planning

What business tools or techniques do we use on rural estates?  Does it all boil down to annual budgeting, assessing performance against projections, capital project planning, the occasional tax review?  Or is there more to it than that?  Strategic environmental analysis perhaps?  Simple SWOT analyses?  Sophisticated investment appraisal using DCF?  Stakeholder analysis?  Cost benefit analysis?  Multi-criteria decision analysis?

Over the next few months I will be researching this question for the Royal Institution of Chartered Surveyors/Royal Agricultural University 100 Club Fellowship.  Please help me by nominating your preferred strategic management tools for the rural estate.  A survey will also be launched soon.  The results are due to be presented at this year’s RICS Rural Conference, Land – delivering on all fronts on 18 June 2015.

So  please do help us to get off to a good start by sharing your experience of planning, marketing and decision-making techniques and tools on the rural estate through the comments box below – or if you would rather do so privately please use the ‘contact’ tab to send me a message.  I look forward to hearing from you.

One wood worth £70,000 but potentially five different Inheritance Tax bills ranging from nil to £28,000. Capital Gains Tax with potential bills on disposal ranging from less than £5,000 to more than £11,000.  This Wednesday’s web class will explain how to keep the tax bill down.  It will also look at the wider benefits that might be available to an estate that keeps its woods in good order.  RICS Web classes are not restricted to RICS members.  They provide a very cost-effective way to make sure you are up to date from the convenience of your own computer, and because they are ‘live’ you have all the benefits of being able to ask questions, and take part in online discussions.  This class in particular is highly relevant to anybody with an interest in private woodland ownership and management.

Details here: http://www.rics.org/uk/training-events/e-learning/web-classes/woodland-taxation-valuation/online/ 

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