Rural Proofing: a key reference for rural activists and analysts

Rural analysts and activists take note.  Defra has updated its rural proofing guidance this week.  This will be a key reference for anybody interested in the development and impact of policies which affect rural areas.  Why?

Because policy measures are meant to have been ‘rural proofed’.  So the criteria for rural proofing are important because they provide a framework for the independent evaluation of rural impact.  They are also therefore a sound basis on which to challenge measures which may adversely affect rural economic, social and environmental interests, or to promote measures which will support these interests.

The Defra guidance tells us:

Thriving rural communities are vital to the English economy. A fifth of us live in rural areas and they are home to a quarter of England’s businesses, and generate 16.5% of the English economy. Rural areas face particular challenges around distance, sparsity and demography and it is important that government policies consider these properly.
Rural proofing is about understanding the impacts of policies in rural areas. It ensures that these areas receive fair and equitable policy outcomes. This guidance sets out a four- stage process to achieve this objective.

Figure One of the Defra Guidance offers this four stage process for rural-proofing:

Rural Proofing Process

The Guidance goes on to suggest this way to assess rural impact:

Rural Impact How to Assess

Worth a look for anybody concerned with rural policy and development nationally, regionally or locally.

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Concise Rural Taxation 2017/17 Now Available

Concise Rural Taxation (formerly Taxation for Students of Rural Land Management) is now an annual publication.  This year’s edition is now available. Continue reading “Concise Rural Taxation 2017/17 Now Available”

Summer Budget 2015: Rural Points – More smoke and mirrors

The Inheritance Tax changes will be the headline grabbing feature for many rural property owners.  But is all what it seems?  A few other budget points also need attention if you’re interested in rural property and farming.

Business-wise the decision to set the Annual Investment Allowance at £200,000 permanently from January 2016 is important, and relatively welcome. Continue reading “Summer Budget 2015: Rural Points – More smoke and mirrors”

Introducing ‘Blight’ – Planning Blight and Compulsory Purchase

I have made four presentations on the topic of planning blight and compulsory purchase.  These are primarily for the land management students at Harper Adams University, but they may be of interest to a wider audience.  The first video describes statutory blight, and deals with the types of owner and property which qualify for blight protection under the Planning Acts.  The second video deals with the procedures for the successful service of a blight notice up to and including a reference to the Upper Tribunal (Lands Chamber).  Video Three addresses the specific and special requirements for blight notices on farmland and the final video in the series reviews discretionary blight, while also picking up some of the advance purchase and compensation schemes which have been initiated by HS2.

Happy Viewing!

Trustee Development Spring 2015

The personal responsibility of an estate trustee far exceeds that of a company director, shareholder, limited liability partner or sole trader. This responsibility extends to settlors and beneficiaries, and many others besides. Many people rely on rural estates for their livelihood and homes. Estates are under wider public scrutiny on a scale never experienced before. The complexities of farming and rural estate management have never been greater. New business opportunities abound for the creative estate manager, but the prospect of commercial reward comes with risk.

Working with the CLA we have devised a one day trustee training course which includes a tour of an award-winning estate. The Rhug estate will be our host on 17 March 2015, and we are delighted to be visiting Ragley Hall for the first time on 21 March.

The programme will ensure that estate trustees know their job: a vital safeguard for settlors, beneficiaries, estate managers, other professional advisers and, not least, trustees themselves.

Training Outcomes
On successful completion you should:
• Understand the extent of the personal responsibility of a trustee to beneficiaries;
• Understand the trustees’ role, authority and responsibility in the management of a rural estate;
• Participate effectively in trustees’ meetings and other trust business;
• Relate effectively to beneficiaries, settlors, staff, key advisers and other interested parties in the strategic management and direction of a rural estate

To book a place please follow this link:

https://www.dropbox.com/s/gsuas1gvrojpiib/Trust%20Programme%20Spring%202015.pdf?dl=0

Alternatively, please email Charles Cowap, cdcowap@gmail.com or call Charles on 07947 706505, or use the contact form below. RICS members, chartered accountants and solicitors will be able to claim formal CPD in respect of their participation.

Estates Gazette Rural View: Christmas Reading

I have been writing a quarterly column for the Estates Gazette since 2013 called Rural View.  This year’s articles have covered Water, Forestry, Scotland and farming safety.  If you’d like to catch up with any of the articles over the Christmas holiday, here they are:

Farming Safety: EG Rural View Dec 14 H&S

Scotland: Rural View Sep 2014

Forestry and Woodland Valuation and TaxationEG Rural View May 2014 Forestry

Water: EG Rural View February 14 Water

Meanwhile a happy Christmas and prosperous new year to all my readers and visitors.

Defra: a challenging brief

The Conversation asked me to write an appreciation of Owen Paterson’s tenure as Secretary of State for the Environment. It was published last night under the title, Badgers may cheer Owen Paterson’s exit from Defra, but not everyone feels the same

A white, middle-aged, country man who nevertheless forgot to take his wellies to a flood zone a stone’s throw from one of his infamous badger cull areas, now finds himself culled. Is this how we should remember the Rt Hon Owen Paterson MP, Secretary of State for the Department of the Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, September 2012-July 2014?

Paterson’s appointment to Defra was popular with farmers and landowners because he was seen as one of their own: MP for that most rural of constituencies North Shropshire, and a leading figure in the European tannery trade. Defra was badly in need of a safe pair of hands after Caroline Spelman’s disastrous attempt to privatise the Forestry Commission. Moving across from the Northern Ireland brief, Paterson was to prove an able choice in this regard.

That is not to say the Defra tractor ploughed a steady course during his tenure. Continue reading “Defra: a challenging brief”