Valuations under the new Telecoms Code: online seminar Friday 26 October 2018

The new Telecoms Code was meant to herald a new era in telecoms developments. All indications so far are that new development is becalmed, and renewals of existing leases are stalled. Why? Several cases are listed for Tribunal hearings; practitioners report considerable inertia in the industry.

The new Telecoms Code sets out for the first time some statutory valuation principles for cases that are referred to Tribunal. But what do the provisions mean? Just what do they say? This online seminar will offer a neutral space in which to consider the new valuation provisions and to reflect on how they may be interpreted in the light of what we know about valuation practice and law generally. We may not know all the answers but we know some good questions! Join us to find out what they are and where we think they take you.

The seminar will take place live on Friday 26 October from 09.30 to 11.00 BST.  Full joining instructions will be sent out beforehand and it is as well to log in a few minutes before 09.30 if you haven’t joined us before to make sure your connection is good and to familiarise yourself with our interactive online environment.

Booking details click here, or copy and paste this link: https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/valuation-under-the-new-telecoms-code-tickets-51158343984

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Compulsive viewing for compulsory purchase

A reminder that this Friday will see the next online seminar in our #RuBrief series.  We are covering compulsory purchase in the form of an update for practitioners with some knowledge of the topic.  After a quick reprise of the overall structure of compulsory purchase we shall focus on some of the latest developments, in particular:

  • The detailed changes now enacted through the Neighbourhood Planning Act 2017 and the Housing and Planning Act 2016.  These include:
  • Important new provisions on notices of entry
  • The ability to serve a counter-notice to a notice of entry – this could be invaluable to the property-owner concerned about the continuing security of property awaiting occupation by the acquiring authority
  • A re-coding of the No Scheme Principle.  This consigns several important cases in recent years to history
  • Important changes to compensation where property is held under a 1954 Act business tenancy.  RIP the Upper Tribunal Lands Chamber decision in Bishopsgate Space Management – or is it?  It all depends when ….
  • The updated Crichel Down Rules guidance from central government
  • New forms and guidance on claims
  • The emergence of new protocols for Lands Chamber references
  • HS2’s guidance on Alternative Dispute Resolution and the scope for wider use of ADR when problems arise

For more details follows this link to find out more about our #RuBrief series in general, or this link to go direct to the booking form.

If you are actively involved in compulsory purchase I would also welcome your participation in a continuing survey which can be found at this link.  Initial results were presented at the RICS National Rural Conference in Cirencester last month.  They can be seen on slideshare and below:

GDPR for property professionals

Another opportunity to sign up for our online seminar on the General Data Protection Regulation.  Eventbrite Booking page here, or our Syncskills/#rubrief page here

We all need to understand these regulations by 25 May.  Clients will require it; others will expect it.  The penalties and publicity for non-compliance will be at the least problematic.

Feedback from our first presentation of this online seminar included these comments on the strengths of our approach:

  • Concise yet informative
  • Simplicity and clarity
  • Clear presentation
  • Clear content, good discussion and engagement with questions
  • good to follow clear and concise
  • simple language!
  • Still in office but good interaction with other professionals
  • Ease of obtaining answers to specific questions
  • Extremely useful overview covering the salient points to note and act on
  • all of it
  • Easy access to ask questions – smallish group
  • succinct and relevant

Please do see for yourself by joining us on our next online seminar.

Trustees and beneficiaries of rural estates: what you need to know and do

Many rural estates are held in trust, generally for reasons of long-term asset protection and security. Trustees carry a heavy burden of responsibility – heavier typically than a company director or shareholder. This online seminar will focus on the legal basis of these responsibilities and the practical measures through which they can be discharged. Essential learning for trustees, beneficiaries and all those – especially from the non-legal professions – who advise them or work for rural and other estates held in trust. The focus is on private family trusts although much of the material is equally relevant to charitable trustees.

This online seminar is the second in our new series for 2018.  Booking and other details can be found here.

Feedback on our first online seminar, on the General Data Protection Regulation, was excellent.  Seventy-two percent of respondents rated it 5/5 and the remaining 28% as four out of five.  Individual comments about the benefits of this approach were:

  • Concise yet informative
  • Simplicity and clarity
  • Clear presentation
  • Clear content, good discussion and engagement with questions
  • Good to follow clear and concise
  • Simple language!
  • Still in office but good interaction with other professionals
  • Ease of obtaining answers to specific questions.
  • Extremely useful overview covering the salient points to note and act on
  • Easy access to ask questions – smallish group
  • Succinct and relevant

Our current programme for the full year can be seen here.

And finally, a question: our first seminar on the General Data Protection Regulation which comes into effect on 25 May 2018 highlighted a lot of issues for rural property professionals and land managers.  Would you like another chance to catch up with this?  If so please let us know below.  If there’s enough interest we’ll see if we can run it again.

Names and addresses: beware!

Do you keep a note of names, addresses or telephone numbers?  No problem if this is entirely in a private and social capacity as you are exempt from the General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) which comes into force on 25 May 2018.  But problems loom if this is in the course of your business, commercial or professional role.

Ask yourself this: can a living person be identified from the data you hold?  For example can you tie the person’s name to an email address or a telephone number?  If the answer is yes you almost certainly need to look at the General Data Protection Regulation.

All businesses must be prepared for the EU General Data Protection Regulations which will cover all personal data used and stored by business with very few exceptions. Penalties for infringement can be high, as much as £17 million or 4% of global turnover. The regulations come into force on 25 May so action is needed now. Continue reading “Names and addresses: beware!”

New: rural online cpd – #rubrief

I am very pleased to announce that I have formed a joint venture with Syncskills to offer a series of web-classes for rural professionals and managers.  These will run on occasional Fridays throughout the year and offer you an easy, affordable and accessible way to receive timely, focussed professional cpd at the comfort of your desk.

All the professional, legal and financial information you need to deliver the highest level of service to your clients:
• Affordable CPD from the comfort of your Office
• A monthly live online session on Friday morning
• A support community on Twitter and LinkedIn to ask questions
• Key points, easy to download and listen again at the end of each session
• No travel time and cost
• Small intereactive sessions to discuss real life challenges and concrete solutions
• Information and content exclusively designed for Rural Land Professionals including agricultural valuers, estate managers and owners.

Bookings are now open for the first class in the series, The General Data Protection Regulation which will affect all rural property professionals when it comes into effect on 25 May this year.  Book here.  Arrangements to protect client and other data need to be reviewed now and changes put in place before the regulation comes into effect.  Prices start at £32.93 for trainee surveyors and valuers with discounts against the full price for RICS, CAAV and CLA members.
Continue reading “New: rural online cpd – #rubrief”

Twenty-five year Environment Plan

The Natural Capital Committee has reported its recommendations for a 25-year Environment Plan.  There are five key sections to this important report:

  1. Vision, ambition and goals
  2. Investment needs
  3. Milestones
  4. Governance
  5. Agricultural subsidies post-Brexit

Twelve goals are offered; these include:

  • Breathable air that achieves international standards;
  • Flood protection by various means including natural flood management to protect everybody against a 0.5% probability of flooding:
  • All inland water to be of good status, and coastal waters all to be good for bathing;
  • Greenhouse gas emissions conforming to international targets, including emissions from land-based activities
  • Access to local greenspace and open recreation for all.  The following goals are suggested:
    • One hectare of local nature reserve per 1,000 people;
    • Two hectares of natural greenspace within 300 m of every home;
    • A 20 ha greenspace within 2 km of every home
    • No suggestion is made that the effect of this has been modelled and compared with the current state of provision.

Turning to investments the report proposes 11 items and these include:

  • 250,000 ha of woodland by 2040;
  • All peat to be in favourable condition;
  • Restoration of hydrological cycles including channel restoration and natural flood management measures;
  • New National Parks (no suggestions as to where);
  • Farm funding to be limited to public goods and high welfare standards;
  • Working closely with Local Nature Partnerships;
  • Developer contributions via planning etc to be pooled for natural capital investment;
  • An enhanced capacity for citizen action and involvement;
  • Natural Capital Net Gain principle which would apply to planning, environmental regulation and public procurement wherever possible;
  • Despite being referred to as investments, none of these are funded or compared with the status quo.

Five year milestones are proposed, which need to be supported by a natural capital risk register; accounting measures; cost benefit appraisal approaches and natural capital balance sheets.  Pp 8 and 9 of the report make particular mention of the private sector in this respect but do not expand on this point.

It is proposed that there should be a State of the Environment Report by 2019 and that this should be updated regularly.  For governance the committee propose that the 25 year Environment Plan should be placed on a statutory footing under the authority of a single organisation, with a separate independent body on the lines of the National Audit Office to report regularly on progress.

The final section is concerned with agricultural policy and is perhaps the vaguest part of the report.  Much is made of the examples of market orientated projects like South West Water’s involvement in Upstream Thinking.  Although the report claims that several water companies are involved in such schemes, this is the only example to be cited.  There are indeed other examples and it is a shame that the report does not address more fully the challenges in developing new thinking in this area compared with its more defined focus in earlier sections.

Perhaps on the other hand however, this should be welcomed by those of us who have spent a lifetime involved in day to day management of rural estates and farms as an opportunity still to bring practical common sense and hard-earned local knowledge to further deliberations on these matters.

This provides the perfect opportunity to finish on an event being organised by the Ecosystem Knowledge Network with the Tatton Estate and the Country Land and Business Association on Natural Capital for Rural Estate Professionals at the end of October.  The latest report from the Natural Capital Committee is an important step forward in defining our rural future – do come and join us to see how this might begin to look on the ground.