Land Management Today

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Land Management TODAY – LMT – is published for the first time today.  The first edition is the work of a group of postgraduate students at Harper Adams University who came together at the end of June to study a module called Land Use and Management.  The first edition contains 28 short articles covering a range of topics.  Download your copy of LMT here: Land Management Today July 2017.

Here is the full contents list:

  1. How farming is set to lose its flavour
  2. Buying into Ecosystem Services – whetting the appetite for diversification
  3. Battery storage, the next big thing for energy production?
  4. Branding: Rural Estates in the head and on the ground
  5. Bringing Back Britain’s Trees
  6. Avoiding Failure with Forwards and Futures .
  7. Smother With Cover: black-grass .
  8. A Tale of Two Leys
  9. Will Dairy Cows Ever See a Human?
  10. Conventional v Organic: Breaking Down Barriers
  11. Diversity & Inclusion; The £24 billion boost
  12. Farm smart in the hills
  13. The Drones are Coming
  14. Finding your perfect partner: Relationships not Rules for land tenure success
  15. State Open for Business
  16. Tax simplification; anything but simple
  17. Spring Budget Basics for Taxation on Rural Estates
  18. Brexit for Breakfast
  19. Agricultural Trade: “Preparing for the Worst, Hoping for the Best”
  20. Soil Health Subsidies
  21. Countryside Stewardship Scheme
  22. Telecommunications-The Implications for Rural Land Owners
  23. Telecoms and the Rise of Statutory Powers
  24. Compulsory Purchase: RICS mandates practice with new PS
  25. Make sure you don’t lose out with Business Rates
  26. No Growth in the Greenbelt
  27. Mid-Tier Countryside Stewardship and Capital Grants – are you missing a trick?
  28. H-App-y Maps
  29. Contributor Profiles

This is the first in what we hope will continue as a series of occasional papers on current topics of concern to land management today.

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Business tools for the rural estate: long and medium term planning

What business tools or techniques do we use on rural estates?  Does it all boil down to annual budgeting, assessing performance against projections, capital project planning, the occasional tax review?  Or is there more to it than that?  Strategic environmental analysis perhaps?  Simple SWOT analyses?  Sophisticated investment appraisal using DCF?  Stakeholder analysis?  Cost benefit analysis?  Multi-criteria decision analysis?

Over the next few months I will be researching this question for the Royal Institution of Chartered Surveyors/Royal Agricultural University 100 Club Fellowship.  Please help me by nominating your preferred strategic management tools for the rural estate.  A survey will also be launched soon.  The results are due to be presented at this year’s RICS Rural Conference, Land – delivering on all fronts on 18 June 2015.

So  please do help us to get off to a good start by sharing your experience of planning, marketing and decision-making techniques and tools on the rural estate through the comments box below – or if you would rather do so privately please use the ‘contact’ tab to send me a message.  I look forward to hearing from you.

Trustees: Need to know 10 – the value of professional trustees

The last item on our list of 10 vital facts for the estate trustee concerns the value of professional trustees.  A professional trustee owes a professional duty of care in exactly the same way as to a client, and will have to be paid for his or her advice in most cases.  Amendments to trustee legislation allow payments to a professional trustee despite the general rule that trustees should not benefit personally from their role.  The professional involvement of a professional trustee should ensure that the trust will receive close professional attention and supervision.  It seems inevitable that there will be a continued growth in the use and deployment of professional trustees in view of the onerous responsibilities associated with the work of a trustee.

This will be one of the topics reviewed in more depth during the forthcoming Trustee Training Events at Rhug estate and Ragley Hall, organised in conjunction with the CLA. For more details:

Trust Programme Spring 2015

STOP STOP PRESS

As previously advised the event at Ragley Hall on 21 April is full.  We are now therefore offering a SECOND DAY at Ragley on 22 April – please use the contact form or follow the details in the link above to register your interest for 22 April.

STOP PRESS

The event at Ragley Hall on 21 April is now FULL.  There are still places at Rhug for Tuesday 17 March.  We are also keeping a reserve list for Ragley in case anybody drops out, and with a view to arranging another day if there is enough interest – so do get in touch if you would like to register for this option, arrange an in-house session or host an event in another area.

This is the last of 10 brief ‘Need to Know’ notes for trustees and their professional advisers.  I hope you have found them useful.  For more information and an opportunity to meet others involved in the work of trustees do book in for one or other of the forthcoming trustee training days at Rhug and Ragley.

Trustees: Need to Know 6 – Third thing for the new trustee

The third thing that the new trustee should do is to review the trust records and accounts to ensure that all is in order, with professional help if necessary.  In particular it is important to ensure that there have been no breaches of trust or other malfeasance.  Trustees are entitled to be indemnified against external liabilities and it is worth checking that suitable insurance policies are in place.  A professional trustee also needs to ensure that an appropriate fee basis has been agreed and fully understood.

This will be one of the topics reviewed in more depth during the forthcoming Trustee Training Events at Rhug estate and Ragley Hall, organised in conjunction with the CLA. For more details:

Trust Programme Spring 2015

This is the sixth of 10 brief ‘Need to Know’ notes for trustees and their professional advisers.

Trustees: Need to Know 5 – Second thing for the new trustee

The second thing the new trustee should ensure is that the assets are all secure.  Are they there?  Are they in good condition?  Is maintenance up to date and are they safe?  Are they insured?  Trustees generally have an overriding right to arrange insurance, and to pay the premium from either trust income or capital.

This will be one of the topics reviewed in more depth during the forthcoming Trustee Training Events at Rhug estate and Ragley Hall, organised in conjunction with the CLA. For more details:

Trust Programme Spring 2015

This is the fifth of 10 brief ‘Need to Know’ notes for trustees and their professional advisers.

Trustees: Need to Know 4 – First thing a new trustee should do

The first thing a new trustee should do on taking up the appointment is to read the trust deed and make sure it is fully understood.  Although the law intervenes in a number of ways with the administration of trusts, the main trust deed is nevertheless the key document which governs how the trust was created, what type of trust it is, the entitlements (or otherwise) of beneficiaries, the rights and responsibilities of the trustees and a host of other vital facts.  Ignorance of this important document will be no excuse for the less than diligent trustee.

This will be one of the topics reviewed in more depth during the forthcoming Trustee Training Events at Rhug estate and Ragley Hall, organised in conjunction with the CLA. For more details:

Trust Programme Spring 2015

This is the fourth of 10 brief ‘Need to Know’ notes for trustees and their professional advisers.