Trustees and beneficiaries of rural estates: what you need to know and do

Many rural estates are held in trust, generally for reasons of long-term asset protection and security. Trustees carry a heavy burden of responsibility – heavier typically than a company director or shareholder. This online seminar will focus on the legal basis of these responsibilities and the practical measures through which they can be discharged. Essential learning for trustees, beneficiaries and all those – especially from the non-legal professions – who advise them or work for rural and other estates held in trust. The focus is on private family trusts although much of the material is equally relevant to charitable trustees.

This online seminar is the second in our new series for 2018.  Booking and other details can be found here.

Feedback on our first online seminar, on the General Data Protection Regulation, was excellent.  Seventy-two percent of respondents rated it 5/5 and the remaining 28% as four out of five.  Individual comments about the benefits of this approach were:

  • Concise yet informative
  • Simplicity and clarity
  • Clear presentation
  • Clear content, good discussion and engagement with questions
  • Good to follow clear and concise
  • Simple language!
  • Still in office but good interaction with other professionals
  • Ease of obtaining answers to specific questions.
  • Extremely useful overview covering the salient points to note and act on
  • Easy access to ask questions – smallish group
  • Succinct and relevant

Our current programme for the full year can be seen here.

And finally, a question: our first seminar on the General Data Protection Regulation which comes into effect on 25 May 2018 highlighted a lot of issues for rural property professionals and land managers.  Would you like another chance to catch up with this?  If so please let us know below.  If there’s enough interest we’ll see if we can run it again.

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